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«Susan Scrivener Michael J. Weiss Alyssa Ratledge Timothy Rudd Colleen Sommo Hannah Fresques February 2015 Doubling Graduation Rates Three-Year ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

DOUBLING

GRADUATION

RATES

Three-Year Effects

of CUNY’s Accelerated

Study in Associate

Programs (ASAP) for

Developmental

Education Students

Susan Scrivener

Michael J. Weiss

Alyssa Ratledge

Timothy Rudd

Colleen Sommo

Hannah Fresques

February 2015

Doubling Graduation Rates

Three-Year Effects of CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate

Programs (ASAP) for Developmental Education Students

Susan Scrivener

Michael J. Weiss Alyssa Ratledge Timothy Rudd Colleen Sommo Hannah Fresques February 2015 The ASAP evaluation is supported by the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Robin Hood Foundation.

Dissemination of MDRC publications is supported by the following funders that help finance MDRC’s public policy outreach and expanding efforts to communicate the results and implications of our work to policymakers, practitioners, and others: The Annie E. Casey Foundation, The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Inc., The Kresge Foundation, Laura and John Arnold Foundation, Sandler Foundation, and The Starr Foundation.

In addition, earnings from the MDRC Endowment help sustain our dissemination efforts. Contributors to the MDRC Endowment include Alcoa Foundation, The Ambrose Monell Foundation, Anheuser-Busch Foundation, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, Ford Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Grable Foundation, The Lizabeth and Frank Newman Charitable Foundation, The New York Times Company Foundation, Jan Nicholson, Paul H. O’Neill Charitable Foundation, John S. Reed, Sandler Foundation, and The Stupski Family Fund, as well as other individual contributors.

The findings and conclusions in this report do not necessarily represent the official positions or policies of the funders.

For information about MDRC and copies of our publications, see our website: www.mdrc.org.

Copyright © 2015 by MDRC®. All rights reserved.

Overview Community colleges offer a pathway to the middle class for low-income individuals. Although access to college has expanded, graduation rates at community colleges remain low, especially for students who need developmental (remedial) courses to build their math, reading, or writing skills.

Many reforms have been found to help students in the short term, but few have substantially boosted college completion. The City University of New York’s (CUNY’s) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), launched in 2007 with funding from the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity, is an uncommonly comprehensive and long-term program designed to help more students graduate and help them graduate more quickly.

ASAP represents both an opportunity and an obligation for students. It was designed to address multiple potential barriers to student success and to address them for up to three years. ASAP requires students to attend college full time and encourages them to take developmental courses early and to graduate within three years. The program provides comprehensive advisement from an adviser with a small caseload and enhanced career services and tutoring. ASAP offers blocked or linked courses for the first year and offers a seminar for the first few semesters, covering topics such as goal-setting and study skills. The program provides a tuition waiver that fills any gap between financial aid and college tuition and fees. It also provides free MetroCards for use on public transportation, contingent on participation in key program services, and free use of textbooks.

This report presents results from a random assignment study of ASAP at three CUNY community colleges: Borough of Manhattan, Kingsborough, and LaGuardia. Low-income students who needed one or two developmental courses were randomly assigned either to a program group, who could participate in ASAP, or to a control group, who could receive the usual college services. Comparing the two groups’ outcomes provides an estimate of ASAP’s effects. Key findings from the report

include the following:

ASAP was well implemented. The program provided students with a wide array of services • over a three-year period, and effectively communicated requirements and other messages.

ASAP substantially improved students’ academic outcomes over three years, almost • doubling graduation rates. ASAP increased enrollment in college and had especially large effects during the winter and summer intersessions. On average, program group students earned 48 credits in three years, 9 credits more than did control group students. By the end of the study period, 40 percent of the program group had received a degree, compared with 22 percent of the control group. At that point, 25 percent of the program group was enrolled in a four-year school, compared with 17 percent of the control group.

At the three-year point, the cost per degree was lower in ASAP than in the control condi tion. Because the program generated so many more graduates than the usual college services, the cost per degree was lower despite the substantial investment required to operate the program.

ASAP’s effects are the largest MDRC has found in any of its evaluations of community college reforms. The model offers a highly promising strategy to markedly accelerate credit accumulation and increase graduation rates among educationally and economically disadvantaged populations.





–  –  –

Community colleges provide relatively affordable postsecondary instruction to millions of students across the country, and their critical role in helping build the nation’s workforce has gained increasing recognition. Unfortunately, many community college students never earn a degree. Completion rates are especially low for students who enter college without all the math, reading, or writing skills they need to do college-level work. Numerous reforms have been tried to help students with developmental education needs succeed, but few have substantially boosted college completion.

In 2007, the City University of New York (CUNY), with the support of the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity, launched Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) to encourage and support community college students to attend school full time and graduate. The exceptionally ambitious program provides a rich array of financial assistance, special courses, enhanced advising, and other support services for three full years.

This report presents important findings from MDRC’s random assignment evaluation of ASAP at three CUNY community colleges. The evaluation targeted low-income students who needed one or two developmental courses to build their math, reading, or writing skills.

ASAP’s effects are the largest MDRC has found in any of its evaluations of community college reforms. After three years, the program substantially increased full-time enrollment, accelerated credit accumulation, and almost doubled the rate of graduating with an associate’s degree. It also increased the likelihood that students would transfer to a four-year school. Positive effects were found for all of the subgroups of students examined in the evaluation. The evaluation also found that, even though ASAP required a substantial investment, the cost per degree was lower among students in the program than it was for those receiving the usual college services.

ASAP’s effects after three years signal the great promise of comprehensive, extended interventions to substantially improve outcomes for community college students. ASAP’s effects are especially notable given that they were for a group of students who entered college with developmental education needs. ASAP shows that such students can succeed with the right combination of services and supports, and without changing what happens inside the classroom.

–  –  –

The City University of New York (CUNY) launched Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) in 2007 with funding from New York City’s Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), and CEO has continued to support the program. In 2009, senior university leadership from the CUNY Office of Academic Affairs — Alexandra Logue, former Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and University Provost; John Mogulescu, Senior University Dean for Academic Affairs and Dean of the School of Professional Studies; and David Crook, University Dean for Institutional Research and Assessment — approached MDRC about the possibility of evaluating ASAP, and we enthusiastically accepted the opportunity. CUNY secured the initial investment for the evaluation from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust; the Robin Hood Foundation provided additional funds soon after. We greatly appreciate their generous backing and ongoing commitment.

We are very grateful to Donna Linderman, the University Associate Dean for Student Success Initiatives and ASAP Executive Director, for her invaluable partnership and collaboration throughout the study. She worked closely with MDRC to launch the evaluation at each college and has continued to play a critical role. We are also grateful to Zineta Kolenovic, currently ASAP Expansion and Replication Specialist, and Diana Strumbos, ASAP Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation, who provided data for the report from CUNY’s Institutional Research Database and have been instrumental in helping us understand the data and key CUNY policies. Daniela Boykin, ASAP Deputy Director, provided helpful information about the program operations throughout the study. Ms. Linderman, Ms. Kolenovic, Ms. Strumbos, and Ms. Boykin also reviewed an earlier draft of this report and provided valuable feedback.

We greatly appreciate the assistance and support of several administrators and staff at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), Kingsborough Community College (KCC), and LaGuardia Community College (LGCC). Space does not permit us to name everyone who has played a role in ASAP and the evaluation, but we want to particularly acknowledge some individuals. President Antonio Pérez and former Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Sadie Bragg at BMCC; former President Regina Peruggi and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Stuart Suss at KCC; and President Gail Mellow, former Vice President for Academic Affairs Peter Katopes, and Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs Ann Feibel at LGCC have supported the project and provided important leadership. The colleges’ current and former ASAP Directors and Assistant Directors — Lesley Leppert-McKeever and Nadine Brown at BMCC; Richard Rivera and Marie Caty at KCC; and Bernard Polnariev at LGCC — worked closely with MDRC to begin the study on their campuses and have been terrific partners over the years. We appreciate all that they and the ASAP staff at the three colleges have done to support the evaluation and bring the program model to life for participat

–  –  –

Many MDRC staff members have contributed to the ASAP evaluation and to this report. Robert Ivry, Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Elizabeth Zachry Rutschow, and Kate Gualtieri worked with CUNY administrators to lay the groundwork for the study. Vanessa Martin worked closely with Donna Linderman and the colleges’ ASAP directors and staff to develop and implement the recruitment and sample intake procedures for the study. She was assisted by Herbert Collado and former MDRC staff member Monica Williams. Joel Gordon, Galina Farberova, Jon Heffley, and Shirley James and her staff developed and monitored the random assignment and baseline data collection process. Herbert Collado and former MDRC staff members Katherine Morris and Shane Crary-Ross participated in visits to the colleges to collect information on the program’s implementation. Leslyn Hall, a consultant to MDRC, coordinated the student survey effort and Abt/SRBI conducted the survey. Jonathan Rodriguez worked closely with one of the report’s authors on the cost research and Chapter 5. Gordon Berlin, Robert Ivry, Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Marie-Andrée Somers, and John Hutchins reviewed early drafts of this report and provided helpful comments. Himani Gupta and Kelsey Patterson assisted in the report coordination and fact-checking. Christopher Boland edited the report, and Stephanie Cowell and Carolyn Thomas prepared it for publication.

–  –  –



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